• FRONT VIEW FROM THE HARBOUR - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    FRONT VIEW FROM THE HARBOUR   1/11
  • INTERACTION WITH THE PUBLIC PARK - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    INTERACTION WITH THE PUBLIC PARK   2/11
  • SITE WITH ROOF PLAN - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    SITE WITH ROOF PLAN   3/11
  • FROM REVIERKAIA PARK - TERRACES OVERLOOKING THE FJORD - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    FROM REVIERKAIA PARK - TERRACES OVERLOOKING THE FJORD   4/11
  • LANDSCAPE AND PUBLIC FLOOR PLAN - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    LANDSCAPE AND PUBLIC FLOOR PLAN   5/11
  • PARK RAMPING UP TO TERRACE - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    PARK RAMPING UP TO TERRACE   6/11
  • SECTION - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    SECTION   7/11
  • EVENING VIEW FROM THE CITY CENTRE - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    EVENING VIEW FROM THE CITY CENTRE   8/11
  • GROUND FLOOR PLAN - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    GROUND FLOOR PLAN   9/11
  • 1ST FLOOR PLAN - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    1ST FLOOR PLAN   10/11
  • 2ND FLOOR PLAN - Oslo Fire Station - SPOL Architects
    2ND FLOOR PLAN   11/11

Oslo Fire Station

The Design Manual for Bjørvika states the following about the development on the site:
“The buildings in the park should appear as pavilions in the green space. The pavilions must have public functions which activate the park. The pavilions ought to face several sides. ”

The fire station is designed precisely to create an interaction between the fire station and the public, a light pavilion in the public park, a floating volume above a landscaped base. The pavilion will stand as a light and illuminating element in the harbour promenade. On the ground floor, the landscape continues through the fire station, placing the fire trucks on exhibition in the cityscape.

The new fire station is designed without front and back, an open and airy attraction that faces the city equally on all sides – a building where the landscape flows through and maximizes the public park. The fire station’s emergency area, living and working quarters are separated from the fire station as an attraction, for Oslo’s residents, tourists, visiting schools and kindergartens.

A horizontal layering: working environment – urban environment – residential environment

The park is designed as an inclining landscape that lifts towards the city forming ledges with views over the seascape. The lawn ends in a wall creating a parallel to the adjacent Military Hospital wall; a relationship is formed along the public space, although it cannot be functionally linked across the road.

The stone wall rises further into a patio towards the city centre. This public space is integrated in the building volume, and forms a covered space where the public gets a good overview of the vehicle hall without being in the way of daily work and emergency call outs. It will be a gathering place for all visitors, curious walkers, kindergartens and school classes on tour.

From here you can safely follow a fire drill, fire constables at full speed down the stairs and on the pole across the patio, with a complete overview of everything going on in the vehicle hall.

PARTILHAR

DETALHES

Client

Oslo Municipality

Location

Oslo, Norway

Site

Festningsallmenningen, felt A2

Area

1 840 m2

Year

2020

Programme

Fire station integrated in a public space along the Oslo harbour promenade.

Status

Competition entry

Team

Jens Noach, Adam Kurdahl, Junjia Yu, Tiago Sjøblom Tavares

Category
Urbano, Cultura